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  1. The following footage was recorded back in 1997 when Doug Hepburn was 71 years old. He challenged the world to duplicate the lifts he performed in the video. Incredible strength in all lifts which were performed raw with no warm-ups and plenty left in the tank to lift more! To read about Doug Hepburn's recommended "Drug Free" Ultimate Strength Building System click here.
  2. Photo from 1955 of Weightlifter and Strongman Paul Anderson. I believe Bob Hoffman appears in the background.

    © Strength-Oldschool.com

  3. * The following training system and information is from the book "Strongman: The Doug Hepburn Story" by Tom Thurston. Edited by: Strength Oldschool This chapter contains all the information that you will need to make yourself as strong as you wish to become. The product of over sixty years of study, experimentation and training, it is easy to understand and employ, works equally well for either sex and produces regular and continuous gains that are precise enough to last months, possibly years, into the future. Since there are no tricks or drugs involved, the strength that results is real and will last well into later life. The first step is to decide how many times a week you will be able to train. For best results, the minimum is two times and the maximum is six times per week. Less than twice will not allow the body enough exertion to realize its potential in either size or power; more than six will not give the body enough time fully to recuperate between workouts - especially if the workouts are rigorous. The second step is to choose the exercises that you feel will most efficiently work the muscle groups that you wish to strengthen, and to organize these routines into a weekly schedule that never exceeds more than three exercises per workout, never work the same muscle group more than three times per week, and if you are working out more than three times a week, never include upper and lower body exercises in the same workout. Failure to follow these rules can over-tax the body within a few months, or even weeks, into your training. If you desire a total body workout but can train only two or three times a week, you should choose the three exercises that will most effectively work the three largest muscle groups. My experience has shown these exercises to be the full squat for the legs, the bench press for the chest and the deadlift for the back. For example: TRAINING 2 TIMES A WEEK (Tuesday + Thursday) Bench Press Squat Deadlift TRAINING 3 TIMES A WEEK (Monday + Friday) Bench Press Squat Deadlift (Wednesday) Olympic Press Squat High Pulls If you desire a total body workout and can train four to six times a week, you should choose six exercises. Three are those mentioned above. The other three should target muscle groups that complement the first three. For best results, I would suggest arm biceps curls (pictured below) for the front of the arm, since the bench press thoroughly strengthens the back of the arm; leg biceps curls for the back of the leg; high pulls for the upper back, since deadlifts thoroughly strengthen the lower back. TRAINING 4 TIMES A WEEK (Monday) Bench Press Deadlift Arm Biceps Curls (Tuesday) Squat Leg Biceps Curls Calf Raises (Thursday) Bench Press High Pulls Arm Biceps Curls (Friday) Squat Leg Biceps Curls Calf Raises TRAINING 6 TIMES A WEEK (Monday) Bench Press Deadlift Arm Biceps Curls (Tuesday) Squat Leg Biceps Curls Calf Raises (Wednesday) Olympic Press High Pulls Arm Biceps Curls (Thursday) Squat Leg Biceps Curls Calf Raises (Friday) Bench Press Deadlift Arm Biceps Curls (Saturday) Squat Leg Biceps Curls Calf Raises With the 3, 4 and 6 times a week schedules, you will notice that on some training days the bench press and the deadlift have been replaced with the Olympic press and high pulls (pictured below). This is because they work more or less the same muscles as the bench press and the deadlift, but are not quite as taxing. If you prefer to employ the more strenuous bench press and the deadlift in place of the Olympic press and high pulls (respectively) this will be fine. Just be aware that in doing so, because you are working each muscle group three times a week, you increase your chances of encountering muscle stagnation. Conversely, if you adhere strictly to the aforementioned training rule of never exerting your maximum lifting ability during training, muscle stagnation should not become a problem. If you want to strengthen a specific muscle or muscle group rather than the body as a whole, feel free to employ any exercises that fulfill the requirement. Take care, however, that you give equal attention to opposing muscle groups. Failure to do so can throw the body out of muscular balance and, as a consequence, make it more susceptible to injury. Two common failures are doing bench presses without doing opposing rowing or high pulls; doing arm biceps curls without opposing arm triceps extensions. Once you have organised your exercises into a workable schedule, your final step is to choose an appropriate training program for each exercise. While scheduling establishes what you want to do, programming outlines how you will do it, by giving precise starting poundages, poundage increases and repetition increases for each exercise. For the purpose of developing maximum size and power in the shortest time possible, my "A" and "B" programs have yet to be beaten. DOUG HEPBURN'S "A" TRAINING PROGRAM FOR SIZE & POWER The "A" program, although the less rigorous of the two, has been designed to increase the lifting capacity of any large muscle group (pectoral or thigh, for example) 120 pounds per year and any small muscle group (biceps or triceps, for example) 60 pounds per year. It is composed of two routines: a POWER routine for developing maximum strength in the muscles, tendons and ligaments, and a PUMP routine for developing maximum muscle size and endurance. The power routine is always completed first. To begin the "A" power routine, pick a poundage/weight that you can lift eight times in a row without resting (eight continuous repetitions) but not nine. For your first workout, perform eight sets of two repetitions with this weight, which is written in weightlifting shorthand as: 8 x 2. A set is one group of continuous repetitions (in this case, one group of two) and you always take a two to three minute rest after each set. For your second workout, add one repetition to what you did in your first workout to get seven sets of two repetitions plus one set of three repetitions, or 7 x 2 and 1 x 3. For your third workout do 6 x 2 and 2 x 3 and keep increasing repetitions in this manner until you can do eight sets of three repetitions, or 8 x 3. At this point, increase your training poundage no more than ten pounds for large muscle groups and five pounds for small muscle groups and return to the 8 x 2 formula. So your workouts should look like this... First Workout: 8 sets of 2 reps Second Workout: 7 sets of 2 reps and 1 set of 3 reps Third Workout: 6 sets of 2 reps and 2 sets of 3 reps Fourth Workout: 5 sets of 2 reps and 3 sets of 3 reps Fifth Workout: 4 sets of 2 reps and 4 sets of 3 reps Sixth Workout: 3 sets of 2 reps and 5 sets of 3 reps Seventh Workout: 2 sets of 2 reps and 6 sets of 3 reps Eighth Workout: 1 set of 2 reps and 7 sets of 3 reps Ninth Workout: 8 sets of 3 reps Once the above-noted power routine has been completed, take a five minute rest and begin your "A" Pump routine. Reduce your training poundages by about twenty percent and, for your first workout, do three sets of six repetitions, or 3 x 6. For your second workout, do 2 x 6 and 1 x 7 and keep adding repetitions in this manner until you can do 3 x 8. At this point, increase your exercising poundage five to ten pounds (less if you feel the need) and return to the 3 x 6 format. So your workouts should look like this... First Workout: 3 sets of 6 reps Second Workout: 2 sets of 6 reps and 1 set of 7 reps Third Workout: 1 set of 6 reps and 2 sets of 7 reps Fourth Workout: 3 sets of 7 reps Fifth Workout: 2 sets of 7 reps and 1 set of 8 reps Sixth Workout: 1 set of 7 reps and 2 sets of 8 reps Seventh Workout: 3 sets of 8 reps DOUG HEPBURN'S "B" TRAINING PROGRAM FOR ULTIMATE SIZE & POWER Once you have employed the above-noted "A" program for at least one full year and wish to embark on a more rigorous training schedule, the "B" program is the ultimate for developing both power and size. Like the "A" program, it is composed of both a power routine and a pump routine - with the power always performed first. It differs from the "A" program in that it incorporates "heavy singles," where the athlete lifts a weight only once before resting. The advantage of this procedure is that it allows you to employ the heaviest poundages possible during your workout, thereby allowing you the fastest strength gains. Be aware, however, that because the poundages used are considerably heavier than those in the "A" routine, there is more danger of injury or overtaxing. To begin the "B" Power routine, choose a warm-up poundage that you can easily lift once. Take a three to five minute rest and increase the poundage to a weight that you can comfortably lift once. After a three to five minute rest, increase your poundage to a weight that you can do for three continuous repetitions but not four, and this will be your training poundage. For your first workout, do five sets of one repetition, or 5 x 1, making sure to take a three to five minute rest after each heavy single. For your second workout, do 6 x 1 and keep adding one repetition per workout until you can do 8 x 1. At this point, increase your training poundage by five to ten pounds (less if you feel the need) and return to the 5 x 1 format. So your 'Power' routine should look like this... First Workout: 5 sets of 1 rep Second Workout: 6 sets of 1 rep Third Workout: 7 sets of 1 rep Fourth Workout: 8 sets of 1 rep After completing the power routine, take a ten to fifteen minute rest and do the "B" Pump routine. Decreasing your training poundage to a weight that you can comfortably lift for eight but not nine consecutive repetitions, perform six sets of three repetitions, or 6 x 3. For your second workout, do 5 x 3 and 1 x 4 and keep adding repetitions in this manner until you can do 6 x 5. At this point, increase your training poundage by five to ten pounds (less if you feel the need) and go back to 6 x 3. So your 'Pump' routine should look like this... First Workout: 6 sets of 3 reps Second Workout: 5 sets of 3 reps and 1 set of 4 reps Third Workout: 4 sets of 3 reps and 2 sets of 4 reps Fourth Workout: 3 sets of 3 reps and 3 sets of 4 reps Fifth Workout: 2 sets of 3 reps and 4 sets of 4 reps Sixth Workout: 1 set of 3 reps and 5 sets of 4 reps Seventh Workout: 6 sets of 4 reps Eighth Workout: 5 sets of 4 reps and 1 set of 5 reps Ninth Workout: 4 sets of 4 reps and 2 sets of 5 reps Tenth Workout: 3 sets of 4 reps and 3 sets of 5 reps Eleventh Workout: 2 sets of 4 reps and 4 sets of 5 reps Twelfth Workout: 1 set of 4 reps and 5 sets of 5 reps Thirteenth Workout: 6 sets of 5 reps Since the number of workout days in the 'Power' routines are different from the number of days in the 'Pump' routines ( 9 workout days in the "A" power routine compared to 7 workout days in the "A" pump routine; 4 workout days in the "B" power routine compared with 13 workout days in the "B" pump routine. It is extremely important that, when you reach the end of either a power or pump routine in either program and are directed by that routine to return to its beginning sets and repetitions, you do not automatically return to the beginning of its corresponding routine at the same time. Each routine must be completed as written, or you will overtax your body by increasing your repetitions and training poundages too quickly. Follow the directions of each routine separately and the programs will take care of themselves. To obtain maximum benefit from these two programs, adhere to the following rules: always keep as relaxed and at peace with yourself as you can; always follow a power routine with its indicated pump routine; never miss a workout, repetition increase or poundage increase; never attempt to accelerate your progress by taking drugs or altering the program. Above all, never "over-train". In other words, never push your body faster than it can physically withstand. This is probably the main reason why lifters fail (notice that I said lifters and not programs) and most lifters are guilty of it at least once in their lives. Sadly, many lifters over-train on a regular basis, but remain unaware that they are doing it. Look at it this way: when a lifter arbitrarily decides to increase his or her training weight ten pounds a week, he or she is really saying 520 pounds a year or 1,040 pounds in two years - a completely unrealistic and unattainable goal. Unable to keep up with such a rigorous schedule, the body will quickly "stagnate" - a weightlifting term that means become unable to lift past a certain poundage due to muscle fatigue. Although all programs will probably result in stagnation if followed long enough, it has been my experience that faithfully following the two rules about repetition and poundage given above will produce constant and predictable gains for at least one year - quite probably two to three. What's more, you will never feel that you're struggling. As friend, protege and twice Canadian weightlifting champion Paul Bjarnason explains it: Should muscle stagnation occur, there is a simple cure. Eliminate the "Power Routine" for two to three weeks and continue the "Pump Routine". If the problem persists, drop the power routine for another two weeks. If the problem is still present and you are adhering to the "no more than one repetition increase per workout " rule, then your training poundage needs to be reduced. You have either started with too heavy a weight or are adding weight too quickly. For best results, a good rule is "never expend your full lifting capability while working out." Occasionally, you can load up your barbell or dumbbell for a maximum lift to gauge your progress. But do this no more than twice a month - and only after your regular workout, followed by a fifteen to twenty minute rest. If a five to ten pound resistance increase becomes too much for your body to handle during any of the aforementioned programs or routines, feel free to reduce the amount of your increases to whatever you feel comfortable with. Since every person gains strength at a slightly different rate - depending on a variety of hereditary factors - it is just a matter of finding what works best for you. Also, be aware that when a person begins a strength program, he or she will usually gain fairly quickly because the muscles will be relatively fresh and quick to respond to the stimulation. As the program continues, however, progress will usually slow as the body begins to feel the effects of the extra work you are putting on it, and you might need to reduce slightly your rate of increase to compensate. Listen to your body as you exercise and you will know exactly when and how much. As long as you regularly increase your training poundages to some degree, your strength will increase in direct proportion. In this case, "slowly but surely" is the only rule to follow. Another common reason why athletes fail in their strength aspirations is because they embark on a program that they do not have the time to maintain. Outside obligations and distractions invariably get in the way until the athlete either skips workouts (thereby destroying the program's long term effectiveness) or quits altogether. It is imperative, therefore, that you examine thoroughly your social obligations before you schedule your training. Better a moderately rigorous schedule that you can stick to, than a super-rigorous schedule that you can't. This is particularly relevant if you plan to compete, because every pound that you are unable to lift due to irregular training is one more opportunity that you give your opponents to beat you. Once you have a specific goal firmly fixed in your mind, whether it is a future meet that you wish to win or a certain amount of weight that you wish to lift by a certain date, spend time meditating on it while you perform your workouts. The more you can visualize yourself succeeding at your goals, the more likely you will be to succeed for real when the opportunity arises. Seven-time World Weightlifting Champion John Davis of the United States (pictured above) once confided to me that he never attempted a lift - either in training or in competition - that he wasn't absolutely certain that he could complete. Former World and Olympic Champions, Paul Anderson, of the United States, Yuri Vlasov of the Soviet Union and Vasili Alexeyev of the Soviet Union also adhered to this philosophy. Visualizing yourself succeeding during your non-training hours also enhances your lifting ability. Many times, while I was preparing either to enter a contest or to attempt a maximum lift, I would spend the entire day before the event not just "watching" myself complete the lift but actually "experiencing" myself completing it - over and over until it felt as though I had performed it hundreds of times. When the time to perform came, I was so "hyped up" I literally exploded with power and confidence. Another mandatory and too often overlooked requirement for maximum size and strength gains is the maintenance of a proper diet. If you wish to gain a lot, you must eat a lot. In preceding chapters, I have referred to the massive amount of food that I consumed during my training (over 10,000 calories a day). If your goal is to compete on a world-class level, you must do the same. If your goal is to get strong for the sake of getting strong, then listen to your body and feed it well every time it asks for food. Just as some athletes find it impossible to realize that the body needs time to recuperate after a heavy workout, so others seem unable to comprehend that it also needs to be adequately fueled after hard exertion. On numerous occasions I have watched enthusiastic athletes undergo a lengthy training session only to sit down to a meal that wouldn't sustain a field mouse. They then wonder why they failed to gain more strength or size. When forcing your body to handle ever-increasing poundages, your food intake must be ever-increasing as well. Your diet must never be random. For maximum strength gains, it must be balanced and high in vitamins, minerals, complex carbohydrates and complete amino acid-based protein. Dietary information has increased dramatically since the '50s, so do some research. Read books and talk to professionals for a program that is compatible with your goals. Once you begin training, weigh yourself daily (in the nude for accuracy) and keep a lifting journal. If you don't experience substantial increases in both strength and body weight, re-evaluate your lifting program and food intake. Also emphasize liquid calories and nutrients. Shakes made from milk, juices, eggs, protein powder and honey are digested more easily than solid foods. Liquids also let the body assimilate more foods in less time, accelerating progress. I also recommend milk, juices, shakes and other liquids during the actual training session. I have, on many occasions, consumed as many as three quarts of milk during a single session, with no ill effects. As a result, I have actually gained weight during my workouts. The only solid foods that can be consumed during a workout are easily digestible high-energy foods such as dates, figs, raisins and honey. But they should be taken in small doses only. This rule also applies to all cold liquids, including water. One of the best ways to obtain quick energy during a lifting session is to drink a mixture of coffee and honey. Since coffee contains caffeine, however, it is recommended that you follow this practice only when you are competing, demonstrating or attempting a maximum lift. Once you have established an effective diet and training program, it is crucial that you receive regular sleep and relaxation to offset your physical exertions. As previously noted, heavy barbell exercise temporarily depletes the body's energy reserves and the only time that the body can replace this energy is when it is at rest away from the gym. At least one hour of extra sleep a day is recommended if you are following the "A" program, and two hours if you are following the more rigorous "B" program. Perhaps even more important than getting enough physical sleep every twenty-four hours is getting enough mental relaxation. Regular meditation will allow the mind, which is constantly racing to keep up with the hectic pace of the world around it, to slow down and relax. Tensions will melt away and you will soon be better able to distinguish those aspects of your daily life that deserve concerned attention and those that do not. During important competitions or public demonstrations, I made it a habit never to stand when I could sit, and never to sit when I could lie on my back with my eyes closed. A lot of athletes and spectators perceived this to be laziness, but it was a simple technique that many world class lifters of the time employed. The great American lifter John Davis, had so conditioned himself in this method that he was able to sleep immediately prior to competing and had to be awakened when it was his turn to lift. As important as it is, at times, to be able to blot out everything around you except lifting and thoughts of lifting, it is equally important to be able to blot out all thoughts of competing and training. Life is more than just exercise; in order to be truly happy, you have to know how to give equal time and attention to such endeavours as family, career, hobbies and relaxation. As philosopher Paul Brunton once said: Be aware, also, that by faithfully following the above-noted programs, you will discover more of yourself. What you accomplish, you accomplish on your own because you have the faith, honesty, courage and determination to delve into yourself and discern your exact capabilities. While dishonest lifters struggle to create an illusion, you tear illusion away and, as a consequence, build a strength of spirit that no dishonest lifter can come close to, and no amount of aging can destroy. Before my conception and implementation of these training principles, the general state of weightlifting was at a standstill. No one in the world, for example, had been able to bench press 500 pounds (which is why it was referred to as the "500 pound barrier"), and most world strength authorities considered it impossible. Not only was I the first man on the planet to do so (completely drug free) (1953, June 30 - Western Sports Centre, Vancouver), I added another 85 pounds to my world record within a few months. My methods were emulated following my gold medal win at Stockholm. The Russian and Bulgarian lifting teams began studying and adopting my principles and training procedures - to the point of following me from competition to competition. This is because they were able to realize early that the total poundage that an athlete lifts over a long and controlled time period is infinitely more beneficial than a series of maximum or near maximum lifts performed over a shorter, more sporadic time period. What you must understand if you are to get the most from your training, is that these principles will work as well fifty years from now as they did fifty years ago because the timing of the routines has been synchronized, as far as possible, with the body's inherent rate of response to training with heavy weight. Athletes and other so-called experts in the field have resorted to drug use because they have been unable to accelerate the effectiveness of these programs and routines in any other way. In conclusion, let me re-affirm the promise that I made at the beginning: this information is all that you will need to become as strong as you wish to become on all three levels of your existence. The rest is up to you. Good luck and good training. Doug Hepburn
  4. Classic photo of bodybuilding legend Bill Pearl (1930 - ). One of the best ever. His bodybuilding books can be purchased here. Bill turned 90 years old on 31 October 2020 and still looks healthy. His older brother Harold is also still alive and well.

    © Strength-Oldschool.com

  5. Bill Kazmaier - A Living Legend Author: Unknown Date of Birth: Dec. 30, 1953 in Wisconsin. Height: 6’3″ Weight: 321 to 350 lbs. Measurements: 60″ chest | 23″ biceps | 17″ forearms | 22+” neck | 40″ waist | 32″ thigh | 20.5″ calves A Biography: He is 6′ 3” and ranged from 330 to 350 lbs. He has a 60″ chest and 23” biceps. He was born on December 30, 1953. He has superhuman strength and even superhuman eyesight: 20/13 in one eye and 20/11 in the other. He is still alive today. He is a powerlifter and strongman who thoroughly dominated the strength scene in the 1980s. He lifted hard, ate a lot and competed for so long and in so many contests, why? Bill was always a big kid when he was growing up like his father. His father, William Bart Kazmaier, was born in 1895 in Lancaster County, PA. Kaz’s grandfather was born in 1871 in Germany and was a brewer by occupation living in Columbia, PA. His grandmother was Mimmie E. Wisser who was born in 1868 in Marietta, PA. There is some reason to believe that she is of Native American decent. Bill grew up in the Southern Lakes region of Wisconsin. He was an excellent high school football player for Burlington High School. He also held the high school’s records in the shot put and in the 100 meter dash. He had trouble with his grades. So, despite his great athletic talent, the University of Wisconsin was the only place that gambled on his admission. He was admitted on a five year program for financially challenged students. (If you were to ask him today, if he had any advise to young weightlifters what would it be, he would reply train hard and hit the books harder.) He played for Wisconsin from 1973-4 as their fullback. While at Wisconsin, he discovered his destiny: lifting weights. Bill decided to leave school and become the top powerlifter in the world. He achieved this in short order. By 1979, at the young age of 25 years old, he did so winning the American powerlifting championships and the IPF world championship that year in the superheavyweight class. Before he launched his career as a strongman, he worked as an oil rig rough neck, lumberjack and a bouncer in some really rough bars. He is remembered for his powers of concentration and perseverance over adversity. He was the first human to bench press over 300 kg. or 660 pounds. He held the world record bench at 661 pounds for a long time. He was the first man to lift all five McGlashen Stones in competition. He remains the only man to lift the Thomas Inch Dumbbell overhead. He could cheat curl 315 pounds for fifteen reps. He still has the IPF and USPF Senior American record total in powerlifting (1100 kg. or 2420 lbs.). He set this in 1981 in Columbus, Georgia. He was an IPF champion twice in 1979 and 1983. In the 1978 national championships in the 125+ kg class in Dayton, Ohio, he squatted 865 lbs. He benched 622 pounds. He deadlifted 804 pounds. This gave him a total of 2292 pounds. In 1983 when he won again in Gothenberg, Sweden in the 125+ kg. weight class. He squatted 848 pounds. He benched 501 pounds with a sever pec injury. He deadlifted 799 pounds. This gave a total of 2149. He also competed in the World’s Strongest Man Contests. He competed in six of them. In 1979, he came in third. From 1980 until 1982, he won the competitions handsomely. He was the first man to win the WSM title three times in a row. In 1981, he tore his pec while bending cold rolled steel bars in the WSM (photo below). This makes his 1983 IPF championship all that much more significant. After this tear, he lost more than one-hundred pounds off his bench. He was forced by the organizers of the WSM into a premature retirement in those competitions. He was simply too dominant in the WSM. The organizers decided not to invite the reigning WSM back to compete for several years. Instead of throwing in the towel and giving up, he continued to compete in lesser known strong man tournaments, such as the Ultimate Challenge and the Le Defi Mark Ten. He returned to the World’s Strongest Man Contest in 1988 and came in second to Jon Pall Sigmarsson. In 1989, he competed again. He came in fourth because he severely strained his ankle in the first event. He is perhaps the single most studied human in history. While he worked as the Strength and Conditioning coach at the University of Auburn, the University’s National Strength Research Center evaluated every aspect of Kaz. His power is the basis for the Holden Thesis concerning Sauropods. In 1983, he returned for a brief stint in the WFL. He turned down offers from the Jacksonville Bulls. In 1981, he tried out for the Green Bay Packers; however, he had to leave camp because of his pec injury. He also wrestled in the WCW. On September 5, 1991 in Augusta GA, Bill Kazmaier teamed up with Rick Steiner in a WCW tournament to decide who would take over the vacant tag team title. Bill Kazmaier proved how fake WCW really is when he lost to Arn Anderson (6’3″ 225 pounds) and his other partner on the Enforcers. Give me a break! At Holloween Hacov 1991, in Chattanooga, Tennessee Bill beat Oz by submission. At the 1991 Starcade Battlebowl: The Lethal Lottery, Bill and his partner Jushin “Thunder” Liger defeated Diamond Dallas Page and Mike Graham in Norfolk, VA. He participated in Rings. He had one match and lost it. Right now, he is still active in the sport, although he is not competing. He served as a commentator for the 1997 WSM in Prim, Nevada. He owns an exercise equipment import/export company called DynaKaz Inc. in Alabama. He imports Air Machine and Panatta. He exports TicenT. Bill was inducted into the York Barbell Hall of Fame. He has a son. He says that his idol when he was growing up was the great Jim Thorpe, not only for his obvious athletic ability, but also his ability to persevere over trials of adversity. Best Lifts Please Note that He Did Not Use Bench Shirts or Squat Suits. Also, in the Squat, He Kept his Back Perpendicular to the Ground, Not like the Good Mornings that Pass as Squats. Competition Squat: 925 pounds (WR). Competition Bench: 661 pounds (WR). Competition Deadlift: 887 pounds (WR) (photo below). Total in Competition: 2425 pounds (WR). Career Statistics These are just a few of his accomplishments in his life. Junior National Powerlifting Champion - 275 Pound Class - (760-512-760-2033) in 1978. Senior National Powerlifting Champion - 275 Pound Class - (782-534-804-2121) in 1978. World Record - Bench Press - Superheavyweight - 617 lbs in 1979. World’s Strongest Man Contest - Finished 3rd in 1979. World Powerlifting Champion - Superheavyweight - (865-622-804-2292) in 1979. World Record - Bench Press - Superheavyweight - 622 lbs in 1979. Strongbow Superman Contest - Winner - 374 lbs Clean and Jerk, 837 lbs Deadlift, 120 lbs X 17 Dumbbell Press in 1980. World Record - Bench Press - Superheavyweight - 634 lbs in 1980. World Record - 56 lb. Weight Toss Over Bar - Scottish Highland Games - Height: 16 feet and 3 inches in 1980. World’s Strongest Man Contest - Winner in 1980. Powerlifting Competition - Best Squat - Superheavyweight - 925 lbs in 1981. World Record - Bench Press - Superheavyweight - 639 lbs in 1981. World Record - Bench Press - Superheavyweight - 661 lbs in 1981. World Record - Powerlifting Total - Superheavyweight - 2424 lbs in 1981. World Record - Dumbell Press in Exhibition - a Pair of 155 lbs X 10 repetitions; a Pair of 165 lbs X 5 repetitions in 1981. World’s Strongest Man Contest - Winner in 1981. World Record - Deadlift - Superheavyweight - 887 lbs in 1981. #2 All-Time Squat in World’s Strongest Man Competition of 969 pounds in 1981. World’s Strongest Man Contest - Winner in 1982. Senior National Powerlifting Champion - Superheavyweight Class - (870-540-837-2248) in 1982. #3 All-Time Deadlift in World’s Strongest Man Competition of 1055 pounds in 1982. World Powerlifting Champion - Superheavyweight Class - (848-501-799-2149) in 1983. Powerlifting Exhibition Best Deadlift - Superheavyweight - 904 lbs in 1983. World Record-56 lb. Weight Toss Over Bar - Scottish Highland Games - Height: 18 feet and 3 inches in 1984. * World Record - Barbell Curl - 440 lbs. in 1985. Ultimate Challenge - Runner up in 1987. Le Defi Mark Ten International - Winner in 1987. World Record - Seated Barbell Press - (Previous Record: Chuck Arens-407 lbs) Kaz: 448 lbs X 3 reps in 1988 (photo below). Muscle Power Classic - 1st Place in 1988. World Record Log Press - 375 lbs. in 1988. World’s Strongest Man Contest - Runner up in 1988. Pure Strength II Team Competition - 1st Place with Stuart Thompson as his partner in 1988. McGloshen Stones - First Man to Ever Lift all Five Stones in Competition in 1988. Louis Cyr Dumbbell Side Raise and Hold - (Louis Cyr - 88 lbs. in one hand and 97 lbs. in the other); Kaz - 89 lbs in one hand and 101 lbs in the other for 6 reps. in 1988. Pure Strength II Team Competition - 2nd Place with partner with OD Wilson in 1989 Louis Cyr Dumbbell Front Raise and Hold - (Louis Cyr - 131 lbs. for 1 rep.); Kaz - 210 lbs. for six reps. World’s Strongest Man Competition - 4th Place in 1989. #2 All-Time Loglift in World’s Strongest Man Competition of 363 pounds in 1989. World Record - Dumbbell Press - 100 lbs X 40 reps. in 1989. Guinness Book of Records - Member of 10 Man Team that Pulled a 14 ton Tractor and Attached Caravan for 2 Miles.
  6. STRONGEST ARMS IN HISTORY ** HEAVIEST EVER CHEAT BARBELL CURL (1 REP MAX) LEADERBOARD ** * Regardless of lifters weight classes or type of barbell used. Heaviest Weight lifted WINS! 1. Denis Cyplenkov - 170 kg (375 lbs) - Ez Bar - (?) - Done for 2 reps! 2. Bill Kazmaier - 143 kg (315 lbs) - Straight Barbell ? - (1985) - Done for 12 or 15 reps! 3. Levan Saginashvili - 142 kg (312 lbs) - Ez Bar - (?) - Done for 3 reps! 4. Magnus Samuelsson - 140 kg (308 lbs) - Straight Barbell - (?) - Done for 4 reps! 5. Chuck Loesch - 140 kg (310 lbs) - Straight Barbell - (?) 6. Doug Hepburn - 136 kg (300 lbs) - Straight Barbell - (1959) 7. Kirill Sarychev - 132.5 kg (292 lbs) - Ez Bar - (2015) - Done for 6 reps! 8. Kyriakos Grizzly - 120 kg (264 lbs) - Ez Bar - (2021) - Done for 14 reps! 9. Leonidas Arkona - 120 kg (264 lbs) - Ez Bar - (2019) 10. __________________________________________ Let's use this forum to document the heaviest weights lifted on a barbell cheat curl and also include some stories regarding those strength legends with "Out Of This World" claims! Let's begin with... Bill Kazmaier It is an Internet rumour that three time World's Strongest Man winner, champion powerlifter and general all round strength legend, has cheat curled 200 kg (440 lbs) back in 1985. He has also reportedly cheat curled 143 kg (315 lbs) for 12 or 15 reps. However, with no photos or video footage or witnesses, those so called records will need to remain a rumour. Kaz was known to be very strong in the arm department but without evidence, who really knows what he would have been capable of. As far as I'm aware, Kaz has never confirmed the 200 kg curl strength feat? Moving on to Strongman... Manfred Hoeberl Manfred built the World's Biggest Arms back in the 90's with a pumped measurement of 26" by Iron Historian Joe Roark. In 1994, Manfred wrote a book entitled "10 Minutes to Massive Arms" detailing at the time, how he trained his arms to get them so big. Within his book, he must have claimed that he could curl 200 kg (440 lbs) because a bodybuilding writer by the name of Steve Neece (RIP) challenged Manfred's claim and offered to pay Manfred $5,000 to prove it. Some sources claim it was really $10,000!! In an Interview back in 2012 (Jan 18) with Viking Strength, Manfred was asked how strong his arms were back in the 1990's when he possessed 25 Inch arms! Manfred's reply was... I'm not sure what year Neece challenged Manfred to prove he was able of curling 200 kg but If Manfred did accept Neece's challenge, he may not have followed through with it due to tearing his bicep in 1997. If you're a Manfred Hoeberl fan check this video out... Let's move on to Strongman... Magnus Samuelsson 1998 World's Strongest Man winner is known to have one of the strongest arms in the world including GRIP having officially closed a number 4 Captains of Crush Gripper. From his training DVD entitled "The World's Strongest Arms", Magnus cheat curled 140 kg (308 lbs) for 4 fairly strict reps. In an Interview with Ironmind back in 2010, Samuelsson stated... To make the reps more challenging and work his grip more during barbell curls he would let the bar roll as far down toward his fingertips as possible during reps, before bringing it back into his hand, curling his wrists, and then continuing the movement. In case anyone ever wonders if Magnus ever tore his biceps...The answer is yes and both of them!
  7. STRONGEST ARMS IN HISTORY ** HEAVIEST EVER STRICT BARBELL CURL (1 REP MAX) LEADERBOARD ** * Regardless of lifters weight classes or type of barbell used. Heaviest Weight lifted WINS! 1. Doug Hepburn (photo above) - 116 kg (255 lbs) - Straight Barbell - (1959) 2. Denis Cyplenkov - 113 kg (249 lbs) - Ez Bar - (2015) 3. Luther Rogers - 107 kg (235 lbs) - Straight Barbell - (1960) 4. Larry Wheels - 105 kg (231 lbs) - Ez Bar - (2020) 5. Bruce Randall - 103.6 kg (228 lbs) - Straight Barbell - (1954) 6. CT Fletcher - 102 kg (225 lbs) - Ez-Bar - (?) 7. Hermann Goerner - 100.2 kg (220.5 lbs) - Straight Barbell (1932) 8. Hafthor Bjornsson - 83 kg (183 lbs) - Ez Bar - (2020) 9. The Gorilla Corey West - 82 kg (180 lbs) - Ez-Bar - (2019) 10. Maurice Jones - 80 kg (176 lbs) - Straight Barbell (?) ** STRICT CURL RULES ** * Old School Rules regarding Strict Curling: Click here. ** Current Strict Curl "online" Rules ** Upper back and butt must stay in contact with wall during full curl motion. During lift, lifter can take a close or wide foot stance. Heels must be 12" / 30 cm from wall during lift. Head, upper arms, wrists and elbows can move as much as you want as long as back and butt remain against wall. Strongman Doug Hepburn (1926 - 2000) who was the 1953 World Weightlifting Super Heavyweight Champion, strictly curled a MASSIVE 255 lbs (116 kg) back in 1959! He used a straight barbell. Quote Source: Ironman article: "Developing Curling Power" - March, 1961 (see below). The current World Record holder hasn't actually improved on the strict curl. Instead, the record has been lowered! As to the reason why...Who knows? That official record today is owned by Denis Cyplenkov with a strict curl (using an Ez-Bar) of 249 lbs (113 kg). Photo below shows Denis setting his first Strict Curl World Record with 108 kg (238 lbs). Keeping track of records throughout history is very challenging as rules keep changing. Doug Hepburn's record on the strict curl should still stand today as it was done standing freely while using a straight barbell. Cyplenkov's curl is a slightly different lift, his back and shoulders are braced against a wall and he's using an Ez-Curl barbell which does make the lift easier, especially on the wrists. More strict curl stats will be added soon so keep checking the leaderboard! If YOU come across any documentation (photographs or videos) that details any lifters performing "Strict Barbell Curl" strength feats, then post them below. In the mean time I'll leave you with an impressive photo of Cyplenkov's arms...The man is a BEAST!!
  8. Strongman Paul Anderson Push Pressing 625 Pounds (1955) By John Grimek Edited by: Strength Oldschool This article refers to Paul Anderson Push Pressing 625 lbs from shoulder to chin level – incredibly strong! Before the USA team left for Munich they worked here in York. Clyde Emrich and Jim George, however, arrived almost a week before and have been training regularly with Chuck Vinci, the bantam. Jim George is the younger brother of Pete, who lifts almost identically in the same style as Pete. Many of you will remember that Pete was a poor presser as compared to his other lifts, but by persistent practice and conscientious effort he succeeded in reaching the point where he can press 260 to 270 lbs in excellent form. His brother Jim is about the same; good on the quick lifts but still lagging in the press, which he is working on to improve. Being only twenty years of age and a good competitor, he should improve considerably. No one expects him to win but outside of the Russians we doubt if anyone will beat him, so he should win a place in the championships. In training here last Friday, the lifter who continues to amaze everyone is the massive Anderson, and massive he is! He looks as if he gained another 100 lbs in the past year. Most of us agree that he might tip the scales at 400 lbs before too long, although he weighs around 345 lbs (24 stone 9 lb !) now. While the fellows continued to warm up and make lifts, Anderson calmly sat on one of the benches sipping honey and gulping some milk, and then decided to warm up himself. He began loading the barbell until the chap who was helping him asked, "How much weight do you want? " "235 lbs " was the casual answer! It's been a long time since we saw that much weight used for warming up. He brought the weight to his chest easily and then, much easier than we anticipated, he pressed it several repetitions, just as any lifter who could press 300 takes 200 and makes a few warm up Presses. Back again he sat on his bench. Another sip of honey, another gulp or two of milk. After five or ten minutes they loaded the bar to 395 lbs. This was his second attempt with a weight that was near his world record. We heard some rumours that he was pressing around 440 lbs, but when we asked him this question, he said it was just rumours. He brought the 395 lbs to his chest by employing a fairly low clean squat, but came up as if he were doing a squat without any weight at all, so easily it appeared. He then pressed it overhead easier than I've seen other heavyweights press 300, not once but three times! He might reach 450 lbs ! Everyone who witnessed this lifting had to yell with laughter at the ease which Anderson pressed this weight. More resting, more honey and milk and then he was back again asking for 415 lbs. This poundage represented more weight than his accepted world's record, but no one will deny that he did not press this weight overhead with ease. Everyone agreed this was more weight than any, who were present, ever saw pressed, and it seemed evident that Anderson would press at least 425 lbs at the world championships and possibly the 440 lbs he was rumoured to have pressed previously. He did say, however, that if his clean was easy he could press easier. We're looking forward to him making 450 lbs before long, possibly at the next Olympics, if all goes well with him. As the lifters warmed up for the Snatch, Anderson sat by watching, still taking a sip of honey and drinking his milk. When the lifters had progressed to a heavier weight, Anderson took 270 lbs for his warm up, making it easily. Back to his resting place... by this time, he was working on his second quart of milk and called for 305 lbs for his second attempt. The weight flew up nicely and this concluded his lifting workout. When asked why he didn't practice more snatching and cleaning, he replied that he doesn't train too much on actual lifting but practices more of the power exercises, and his favourite is the one I have always recommended to those who wanted to improve their Presses and Jerks - by supporting a heavy weight on the chest in such a way as if you're going to press it. No one but Anderson! Anderson amazed everyone by loading the bar to 625 lbs and sent the weight almost to the top of his head several times! I've held that much weight on my chest years ago, but I have never been able to move it, much less get it that high! And I doubt if anyone ever did outside of Anderson. Later he performed several squats with this weight... just to keep his thighs limber, or so he says! Everyone seemed to enjoy their last workout before they left the next day. Bradford, however, didn't show up till later and took his workout that evening. Pete George was flown over earlier by the army. His brother Jim informed us he was in the armed service. Members of the team included Chuck Vinci, Tommy Kono, Jim George, Clyde Emmrich, Jim Bradford and Anderson. Hoffman was coach, Terpak trainer and Johnson manager. Alan Hool our Mexican representative, went along on the trip as a spectator. Norbert Schemansky (photo above) and Sheppard didn't make the trip because each was confined to his job and unable to get off. I hinted at Sheppard giving up lifting last month, but then I wasn't positive and felt sure that he might get back into training. However, he doesn't seem to be interested at the moment and may never be again, but there is still some chance that the lure of the coming Olympics may stir within his chest and find him getting into shape for this event. But only time can bear out this statement. Schemansky is so busy learning the finer points of police work that he is attending a special school for the police, so could not get the time off to compete in the world championships. He planned entering the midheavyweight class. With he and Sheppard holding that position, it's doubtful if the Russians could score against them, but the sad part of this is that both these men, who were potential winners, didn't even make the trip. The American team has little chance of winning. They have some hope of getting three, possibly four championships, but actually, the only sure title which can be preconcluded is in the heavyweight class. The others who have some chance and might come through are: Chuck Vinci, Pete George and Tommy Kono (photo below). * The Saturday Evening Post - Aug 23 - 1919. The Saturday Evening Post (photo above is not the actual issue), the October 8 issue, features a rather lengthy article on Paul Anderson, pointing out reasons why he is the world's strongest man. The article is interesting and should bring about many additional converts to the lifting game. Ever since the Americans visited Russia, lifting has had an added boost, and placed Anderson in the limelight. The governor of Georgia already proclaimed a "Paul Anderson Day" but now the Jr Chamber of Commerce in Toccoa, Georgia, have plans to erect a statue of Anderson at the cross-roads! Goodness only knows what other proclamations will come to pass before the fame of Anderson dies down! * A recent photo of the Paul Anderson Statue. One thing I will lay my money on, is that Paul Anderson, providing he wins and makes a record or two, will receive even more outstanding publicity than he did up to now. I predict that after these championships, every man, woman and child will hear or know about Anderson. * Strongman Paul Anderson did actually go on to win the 1956 Olympic Weightlifting Championships. John Grimek NOTE by Strength Oldschool: The above article comes from the attached photos below...
  9. Chuck Sipes Bench Press Power Training Program - 5 Days a Week By Dennis B. Weis We shall now look into the training wisdom that Chuck Sipes has shared with me by letter and long distance phone conversation. One of the things that really impresses me about Sipes is this: he has never neglected to write a reply to my letters. He always answered immediately and his solutions were very well thought. The point that makes this a great effort on Chuck’s part is the fact that at the time I was in heavy correspondence with him (the late 1960’s) he was a youth counselor at a California reformatory, was doing strength shows worldwide and was in heavy competition for such titles as Mr. World and Mr. Olympia. He was also training to bench press 600 lbs. at a bodyweight of 230. It is hard to see where he could find the time to answer my letters as well as those of countless others he was in regular contact with. The one thing that I have noted about all the training advice from Chuck is his constant belief that one should include heavy supporting movements to build up the tendon and ligament strength. From the beginning of correspondence with Chuck he always stressed taking germ oils, sunflower seeds, papaya, peanuts and lots of milk. He always advised me to constantly add weight whenever I could for maximum stimulation of growth and strength. He once mentioned that I should use a jump rope for 4 sets of one minute all-out jumping at the end of my workouts. The one advantage to using the rope is that it only takes a small area in which to use it. Here in Alaska it’s not always possible to run outdoors! During one of my letters to Sipes, I was very interested in increasing my bench press. This is one of the routines that he suggested I use. For this Bench Press routine he said to begin at least 6 months before a meet. This is a five days per week routine which is very intense. There is much direct effort stimulating the ligaments and tendons. Monday & Wednesday * Warm up Prone, regular grip – 2 sets x 10 reps. Bench Press – 2x6; 2x4; 2x2; 4 singles. Tuesday & Thursday Heavy Supports – 5x8. (100 lbs. over best press from ¼ way down to lockout.) * Prones – Close to maximum poundage. Heavy Supports – 150 lbs. over best press, holding with a slight elbow bend. * Prones – close to maximum poundage. * NOTE by Strength Oldschool: Not sure what Chuck Sipes means by "Prones"? It may mean performing Lying Barbell Rows for the Back muscles. A modern gym equipment version of this exercise can be seen below... Friday Incline Press, wide grip, slowly – 4x6. Dumbbell Incline Press, slowly – 4x6. Pullovers, very light weight, deep breaths following 1 minute skipping – 2x20 Flat Flyes, very deep breaths – 4x8.
  10. 1954 Interview with Strongman Doug Hepburn By Ray Beck On the 24th of April, 1954, I interviewed my friend Doug Hepburn and asked him some of the most frequently asked questions concerning himself and his training. Some of the opinions Doug voiced may surprise and even shock the gentle reader, so please bear in mind that these are the opinions of Doug Hepburn and not necessarily those of the writer or this magazine. I am using the Q & A format, quoting Doug directly. Q: How about a few vital statistics, Doug? A: I’m 27 years old, weigh 296 lbs., chest 57½ normal, thigh 32½, arm 22 (on anybody’s tape), forearm 15¾ held straight and I span 26 inches across the shoulders. * Here is a man who actually does turn sideways when he goes through a doorway. Q: What is your present diet? A: I adhere to no set schedule . . . I eat when I feel like it. In the case of a man competing with heavyweight lifters in an area where they weigh up to 300 lbs. and over, he must force-feed himself to get and maintain this needed bodyweight. Forced food intake is not a healthy thing, but there is no moderation for a competing man. Extra weight around the midsection acts as a support in pressing by giving better leverage and acts also as a cushion in squatting . . . A strongman should be 5’10” tall and have a “squat-like” build like Paul Anderson. * Doug went on to say that he eats large quantities of protein supplement to retain his heavy bodyweight because “it’s easier assimilated than other foods". Q: Who is the best lifter? A: Pound for pound Tommy Kono is the best lifter. A: A number of Russian lifters in the lighter divisions are very outstanding. The most efficient lifter, I think, is Norbert Schemansky. I have great respect for men lifting such enormous poundages at such a bodyweight. A: Marvin Eder is a very strong young man, especially in the pressing department, and should do well in the three lifts if he can get amateur standing. Q: Can you give some hints to would-be strongmen? (This question led to several other topics and his principal comments are quoted here). A: I must see a man try . . . train for six months before I would help him . . . he must have the drive. It is harder to be a lifter than a bodybuilder . . . lifting is purely masculine whereas bodybuilding entails feminine traits. Bodybuilders remind me of a woman getting ready to go somewhere. Can you tell me that greasing your body up and posing in front of a mirror is masculine? A bodybuilder puts strength secondary to his physique, whereas the lifter puts strength foremost because it is more masculine to do so. The reason bodybuilding is on the upward trend is that the opposite sex have more and more influence over the males. Women do not like the large waistline necessary for the weightlifter . . . No! You don’t have to first become a bodybuilder to become a weightlifter. A: Three reps in the various exercises are all you need to build size and strength. Low reps give a maximum improvement in strength and size of muscle and a minimum of fatigue. You don’t need a “pumped up” feeling to get big muscles. I tried high reps for my arms when I wanted to make them larger and I found they did nothing for my arm size. In any exercise I like doing 3 reps and no more than 5 reps. Sometimes I do one rep for good results. Exercises should be devoted to increasing the strength in regard to certain muscles used in lifting and that does not include the calves, pecs or biceps. A: I work out when I feel like it and do as many sets as my energy will allow. * My personal observation of Doug is that he does only one or two exercises a day when training for strength, and these exercises are: the full squat, supine press, and military press. He is now working really hard on the dead hang pull-ups in reps of two. This has brought his clean up to 400 lbs., which he did while training. * Doug then went on to say, “I believe the king of all exercises is the bench press (see photo below showing Doug Bench Pressing). However, I did get most of my power from handstand presses at which I did 15 reps at a bodyweight of 245 lbs." * Doug doesn’t do these handstand presses anymore, nor does he do the deadlift very often, except when training for a record in this lift, although he thinks they are important strength-giving exercises. Q: What hours do you sleep? A: I average ten hours sleep a day. Weightlifting is very hard on the nervous system, so therefore sleep and rest is needed for the muscles and the nerves to recover. * Doug’s regular sleeping hours are from 2 a.m. to 1 p.m. He keeps late hours. Q: Doug, what do you do in your spare time? A: I rest . . . lay around in the sun . . . conserve my energy. Among my recreational interests are playing snooker, going to the cinema, reading my encyclopedia, discussing philosophy, memorizing poetry. * He then gave a wonderful 10-minute recitation of Kellogg’s Spartacus to the Gladiators at Capua. * Memorizing lengthy bits of poetry is only a small part of Doug’s literary activities. He is well read on many subjects pertaining to human behavior and is at present studying Yogic teachings and mysticism as interpreted by Paul Brunton. * Doug is constantly enlarging his knowledge and understanding of life and its many forms. To Doug Hepburn, weightlifting is hard work. His right calf deficiency will not permit the full movement necessary for heavy cleans. This is a barrier, one that he is fighting in order to please public demand that he continue in the Olympic lifts. He is a weightlifter by public pressure and not by personal choice. He is and will be by his own choice a strongman, in the true sense of the word. He enjoys doing feats which require a minimum of skill and a maximum of strength. He can’t picture Louis Cyr doing the Olympic lifts. He wants to be known, for years after his death, as the strongest man that ever lived. It is quite common to hear Doug say something like this: What's your thoughts after reading this Interview with Doug? To share your comments or stories on the legend Doug Hepburn, post your comments below.
  11. Doug pressing 370 lbs in the early 1950's, which was above the world record at this time. Photo by Ray Beck. Watch this great video on Hepburn....LEGEND!

    © Strength-Oldschool.com

  12. Doug Hepburn training squats back in the 1950's at Ed Yarick's Gym in Oakland California. I love how everyone in the gym is staring in amazement. Doug Hepburn worked hard on writing his life story with writer Tom Thurston and released "Strongman: The Doug Hepburn Story". Great read if you're a fan of the man.

    © Strength-Oldschool.com

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