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Found 7 results

  1. Photo from 1955 of Weightlifter and Strongman Paul Anderson. I believe Bob Hoffman appears in the background.

    © Strength-Oldschool.com

  2. Anthony Ditillo Training Routines for Bulk and Power Routine #1 This full schedule should be repeated 2 times per week. However, if you want, you could increase it to three times per week, but this is up to your ability to handle work. Monday and Thursday: Squat – One set of 10 reps, as a warmup, followed by five sets of five reps using all the weight possible for each set. Deadlift – Same as Squat. Bench Press – Same as Squat. Bentover Row – Same as Squat. Routine #2 This kind of training routine is more severe and that is why you only do 2 movements per training day. You will be working these 2 movements quite hard and this will cause you to gain. Monday: Squat – 1×10; 1×8; 1×6; 1×4; 1×2 and then 5 sets of 3-5 reps using all the weight possible. Bench Press – Same as squat. Thursday: Deadlift – same sets and reps as Monday. Bentover Row – same sets and reps as Monday. Routine #3 This would be the ordinary every other day schedule for the ambitious, underweight trainee. Monday, Wednesday and Friday: Squat – 5 sets of 3 to 5 reps using all the weight possible. Bench Press – same as Squat. Deadlift – same as Squat. Bentover Row – same as Squat. Routine #4 This type of routine would enable you to concentrate on one movement per workout for power and the other two for added muscular bulk. However, you will positively have to be sure to eat enough of the complete protein foods and get more than enough calories in order to grow. Monday: Squat – 1 set of 10 for a warmup, and then 8-10 sets of 3 reps using all the weight you can possibly handle for each set. Bench Press – 2 sets of 10 for a warmup and then 3 sets of 5 reps using all the weight you can possibly handle. Bentover Row – 2 sets of 10 for a warmup and then 3 sets of 5 reps using all the weight you can possibly handle. Thursday: Deadlift – 1 set of 10 for a warmup, and then 8-10 sets of 3 reps using all the weight you can possibly handle for each set. Bench Press – 2 sets of 10 reps, and then 3 sets of 5 reps using all the weight you can possibly handle. Bentover Row – 2 sets of 10 reps, and then 3 sets of 5 reps using all the weight you can possibly handle. Bulk And Power Routine No. 1 In this routine you will be performing the three basic power lifts. In it you use both low and high repetitions. This will allow you to gain in both muscular power and muscular size. Monday, Wednesday and Friday: Bench Press: 5 sets of 2-4 reps Bench Press: 2 sets of 10 reps Full Squat: 5 sets of 2-4 reps Full Squat: 2 sets of 10 reps Deadlift: 5 sets of 2-4 reps Deadlift: 2 sets of 10 reps Bulk And Power Routine No.2 In this routine I have you working for bulk in the upper body while you are specializing on the lower body for power. The sets and reps are well suited to gaining in both and I have even broken down the workouts themselves into three distinct sections. I have you working the chest and shoulders on Monday and the back and arms on Wednesday (rowing and cleans work the arms quite hard!). Then on Friday I have you really work your thighs and hips and back. Monday: Bench Press: 5 sets of 3-5 reps Incline Press: 5 sets of 3-5 reps Wednesday: Bent Over Row: 5 sets of 3-5 reps Hang Cleans: 5 sets of 3-5 reps Friday: Full Squat: 10 singles using 90% of your one rep limit Deadlift: 10 singles using 90% of your one rep limit Bulk And Power Routine No. 3 This routine has you training for power on the bench press and the seated press while your leg and back work aids in gaining size. Monday: Full Squat: 1 set of 20 reps using a weight which is 50lbs. greater than bodyweight. Take 5 deep breaths between each rep. Deadlift: 1 set of 20 reps using a weight which is 50 lbs. greater than bodyweight. Take 5 deep breaths between each rep. Heavy Bent Arm Pullover: 5 sets of 5-7 reps, maximum weight Wednesday: Full Squat: 5 sets of 5-7 reps Deadlift: 5 sets of 5-7 reps Bench Press: 10 singles with 90% of your 1 rep limit Friday: Half Squat: 5 sets of 3-5 reps High Deadlift: 5 sets of 3-5 reps Seated Press: 10 singles with 90% of your 1 rep limit Bulk And Power Routine No. 4 Monday and Thursday: Bench Press: 10 sets of 3 reps Bent Row: 10 sets of 3 reps Full Squat: 10 sets of 3 reps Tuesday and Friday: Incline Press: 5 sets of 5-7 reps Deadlift: 5 sets of 5-7 reps Half Squat: 5 sets of 5-7 reps Bulk And Power Routine No. 5 Monday: Full Squat: 10 sets of 3 reps Dip: 5 sets of 5-7 reps Weighted Chin: 5 sets of 5-7 reps Wednesday: Deadlift: 10 sets of 3 reps Bent Arm Flyes: 5 sets of 5-7 reps Curl: 5 sets of 5-7 reps Friday: Bench Press: 10 sets of 3 reps Half Squat: 5 sets of 5-7 reps Rack Deadlift: 5 sets of 5-7 reps Intermediate Mass Program The intermediate mass program is NOT for the advanced man. He would never respond to the amount of work I’m going to advise herein. Being advanced necessitates diversity in performance and volume of work as well as tightening up the dietary schedule, since continued weight gain would NOT be desirable for the truly advanced man who has already gained sufficiently in basic bodyweight. For the majority of beginners and intermediates, three total body workouts per week seems to be just about right. You will have two heavy days and one medium day, for variety and recuperation. On your two heavy days the movements are heavy and basic. The repetitions are kept low to enable you to use truly heavy weights to ensure mass gains. The first and second sets should be warmup sets. Sets three, four and five are to be performed with all the weight possible for the required reps. Rest no longer than one minute between sets. When sets three, four and five can be done fairly easily, add ten pounds to your upper body movements and twenty pounds to the lower body movements. The entire schedule consists of between twenty-five and thirty sets. Surely this much work can be finished within ninety minutes. Monday & Friday (heavy days) Press Behind Neck – 5 sets of 5-7 reps. Bentover Barbell Row – 5 sets of 8-10 reps. Barbell Curl – 3 sets of 8-10 reps. Lying Triceps Press – 3 sets of 8-10 reps. Half Squat – 5 sets of 8-10 reps. * On your off days, do four or five sets of calf raises and light abdominal work. Wednesday (medium day) Dips – 4-5 bodyweight sets doing all the reps you can. Chins – the same as dips. Full Squats – 2 sets of 20 reps as described. Stiff-Legged Deadlift – 2 sets of 10-15 reps using light to medium weight.
  3. Bill Kazmaier - A Living Legend Author: Unknown Date of Birth: Dec. 30, 1953 in Wisconsin. Height: 6’3″ Weight: 321 to 350 lbs. Measurements: 60″ chest | 23″ biceps | 17″ forearms | 22+” neck | 40″ waist | 32″ thigh | 20.5″ calves A Biography: He is 6′ 3” and ranged from 330 to 350 lbs. He has a 60″ chest and 23” biceps. He was born on December 30, 1953. He has superhuman strength and even superhuman eyesight: 20/13 in one eye and 20/11 in the other. He is still alive today. He is a powerlifter and strongman who thoroughly dominated the strength scene in the 1980s. He lifted hard, ate a lot and competed for so long and in so many contests, why? Bill was always a big kid when he was growing up like his father. His father, William Bart Kazmaier, was born in 1895 in Lancaster County, PA. Kaz’s grandfather was born in 1871 in Germany and was a brewer by occupation living in Columbia, PA. His grandmother was Mimmie E. Wisser who was born in 1868 in Marietta, PA. There is some reason to believe that she is of Native American decent. Bill grew up in the Southern Lakes region of Wisconsin. He was an excellent high school football player for Burlington High School. He also held the high school’s records in the shot put and in the 100 meter dash. He had trouble with his grades. So, despite his great athletic talent, the University of Wisconsin was the only place that gambled on his admission. He was admitted on a five year program for financially challenged students. (If you were to ask him today, if he had any advise to young weightlifters what would it be, he would reply train hard and hit the books harder.) He played for Wisconsin from 1973-4 as their fullback. While at Wisconsin, he discovered his destiny: lifting weights. Bill decided to leave school and become the top powerlifter in the world. He achieved this in short order. By 1979, at the young age of 25 years old, he did so winning the American powerlifting championships and the IPF world championship that year in the superheavyweight class. Before he launched his career as a strongman, he worked as an oil rig rough neck, lumberjack and a bouncer in some really rough bars. He is remembered for his powers of concentration and perseverance over adversity. He was the first human to bench press over 300 kg. or 660 pounds. He held the world record bench at 661 pounds for a long time. He was the first man to lift all five McGlashen Stones in competition. He remains the only man to lift the Thomas Inch Dumbbell overhead. He could cheat curl 315 pounds for fifteen reps. He still has the IPF and USPF Senior American record total in powerlifting (1100 kg. or 2420 lbs.). He set this in 1981 in Columbus, Georgia. He was an IPF champion twice in 1979 and 1983. In the 1978 national championships in the 125+ kg class in Dayton, Ohio, he squatted 865 lbs. He benched 622 pounds. He deadlifted 804 pounds. This gave him a total of 2292 pounds. In 1983 when he won again in Gothenberg, Sweden in the 125+ kg. weight class. He squatted 848 pounds. He benched 501 pounds with a sever pec injury. He deadlifted 799 pounds. This gave a total of 2149. He also competed in the World’s Strongest Man Contests. He competed in six of them. In 1979, he came in third. From 1980 until 1982, he won the competitions handsomely. He was the first man to win the WSM title three times in a row. In 1981, he tore his pec while bending cold rolled steel bars in the WSM (photo below). This makes his 1983 IPF championship all that much more significant. After this tear, he lost more than one-hundred pounds off his bench. He was forced by the organizers of the WSM into a premature retirement in those competitions. He was simply too dominant in the WSM. The organizers decided not to invite the reigning WSM back to compete for several years. Instead of throwing in the towel and giving up, he continued to compete in lesser known strong man tournaments, such as the Ultimate Challenge and the Le Defi Mark Ten. He returned to the World’s Strongest Man Contest in 1988 and came in second to Jon Pall Sigmarsson. In 1989, he competed again. He came in fourth because he severely strained his ankle in the first event. He is perhaps the single most studied human in history. While he worked as the Strength and Conditioning coach at the University of Auburn, the University’s National Strength Research Center evaluated every aspect of Kaz. His power is the basis for the Holden Thesis concerning Sauropods. In 1983, he returned for a brief stint in the WFL. He turned down offers from the Jacksonville Bulls. In 1981, he tried out for the Green Bay Packers; however, he had to leave camp because of his pec injury. He also wrestled in the WCW. On September 5, 1991 in Augusta GA, Bill Kazmaier teamed up with Rick Steiner in a WCW tournament to decide who would take over the vacant tag team title. Bill Kazmaier proved how fake WCW really is when he lost to Arn Anderson (6’3″ 225 pounds) and his other partner on the Enforcers. Give me a break! At Holloween Hacov 1991, in Chattanooga, Tennessee Bill beat Oz by submission. At the 1991 Starcade Battlebowl: The Lethal Lottery, Bill and his partner Jushin “Thunder” Liger defeated Diamond Dallas Page and Mike Graham in Norfolk, VA. He participated in Rings. He had one match and lost it. Right now, he is still active in the sport, although he is not competing. He served as a commentator for the 1997 WSM in Prim, Nevada. He owns an exercise equipment import/export company called DynaKaz Inc. in Alabama. He imports Air Machine and Panatta. He exports TicenT. Bill was inducted into the York Barbell Hall of Fame. He has a son. He says that his idol when he was growing up was the great Jim Thorpe, not only for his obvious athletic ability, but also his ability to persevere over trials of adversity. Best Lifts Please Note that He Did Not Use Bench Shirts or Squat Suits. Also, in the Squat, He Kept his Back Perpendicular to the Ground, Not like the Good Mornings that Pass as Squats. Competition Squat: 925 pounds (WR). Competition Bench: 661 pounds (WR). Competition Deadlift: 887 pounds (WR) (photo below). Total in Competition: 2425 pounds (WR). Career Statistics These are just a few of his accomplishments in his life. Junior National Powerlifting Champion - 275 Pound Class - (760-512-760-2033) in 1978. Senior National Powerlifting Champion - 275 Pound Class - (782-534-804-2121) in 1978. World Record - Bench Press - Superheavyweight - 617 lbs in 1979. World’s Strongest Man Contest - Finished 3rd in 1979. World Powerlifting Champion - Superheavyweight - (865-622-804-2292) in 1979. World Record - Bench Press - Superheavyweight - 622 lbs in 1979. Strongbow Superman Contest - Winner - 374 lbs Clean and Jerk, 837 lbs Deadlift, 120 lbs X 17 Dumbbell Press in 1980. World Record - Bench Press - Superheavyweight - 634 lbs in 1980. World Record - 56 lb. Weight Toss Over Bar - Scottish Highland Games - Height: 16 feet and 3 inches in 1980. World’s Strongest Man Contest - Winner in 1980. Powerlifting Competition - Best Squat - Superheavyweight - 925 lbs in 1981. World Record - Bench Press - Superheavyweight - 639 lbs in 1981. World Record - Bench Press - Superheavyweight - 661 lbs in 1981. World Record - Powerlifting Total - Superheavyweight - 2424 lbs in 1981. World Record - Dumbell Press in Exhibition - a Pair of 155 lbs X 10 repetitions; a Pair of 165 lbs X 5 repetitions in 1981. World’s Strongest Man Contest - Winner in 1981. World Record - Deadlift - Superheavyweight - 887 lbs in 1981. #2 All-Time Squat in World’s Strongest Man Competition of 969 pounds in 1981. World’s Strongest Man Contest - Winner in 1982. Senior National Powerlifting Champion - Superheavyweight Class - (870-540-837-2248) in 1982. #3 All-Time Deadlift in World’s Strongest Man Competition of 1055 pounds in 1982. World Powerlifting Champion - Superheavyweight Class - (848-501-799-2149) in 1983. Powerlifting Exhibition Best Deadlift - Superheavyweight - 904 lbs in 1983. World Record-56 lb. Weight Toss Over Bar - Scottish Highland Games - Height: 18 feet and 3 inches in 1984. * World Record - Barbell Curl - 440 lbs. in 1985. Ultimate Challenge - Runner up in 1987. Le Defi Mark Ten International - Winner in 1987. World Record - Seated Barbell Press - (Previous Record: Chuck Arens-407 lbs) Kaz: 448 lbs X 3 reps in 1988 (photo below). Muscle Power Classic - 1st Place in 1988. World Record Log Press - 375 lbs. in 1988. World’s Strongest Man Contest - Runner up in 1988. Pure Strength II Team Competition - 1st Place with Stuart Thompson as his partner in 1988. McGloshen Stones - First Man to Ever Lift all Five Stones in Competition in 1988. Louis Cyr Dumbbell Side Raise and Hold - (Louis Cyr - 88 lbs. in one hand and 97 lbs. in the other); Kaz - 89 lbs in one hand and 101 lbs in the other for 6 reps. in 1988. Pure Strength II Team Competition - 2nd Place with partner with OD Wilson in 1989 Louis Cyr Dumbbell Front Raise and Hold - (Louis Cyr - 131 lbs. for 1 rep.); Kaz - 210 lbs. for six reps. World’s Strongest Man Competition - 4th Place in 1989. #2 All-Time Loglift in World’s Strongest Man Competition of 363 pounds in 1989. World Record - Dumbbell Press - 100 lbs X 40 reps. in 1989. Guinness Book of Records - Member of 10 Man Team that Pulled a 14 ton Tractor and Attached Caravan for 2 Miles.
  4. Rack Work - The Key to Power Lifting (1964) By Terry Todd Several years ago, Bill March (pictured below) began to take rapid and successive steps up the ladder of Olympic lifting. His gains in power and physique were both regular and phenomenal. These gains were in part due to a system of training devised and refined by Dr. John Ziegler. We know this system by many names, such as limited movement, isotronics, partial movement, isometronics, and so on. However, as the system has spread and been adopted by the weight trainers of the country, a name has been used with ever increasing clarity and regularity . . . Rack Work. This name (Rack Work) sums up in simple terms the essence of the new system of training. Strangely enough, not much has been written on the applicability of rack work to powerlifting (1964). The chief reason for this is doubtless because only recently have the Power Lifts emerged as a popular sport. Up until a few years ago, the bench press, squat, and deadlift were used only as a means to an end and not as an end in themselves. This has changed almost overnight, and soon national, and possibly international championships will be held in Power Lifting. The purpose of Power Lifting is to determine a man's all-around bodily strength,and the three lifts now generally used; the bench press, squat, and deadlift, are well chosen for this task. They all involve large areas of the body's voluntary musculature and they all require a minimum of technique. This is in direct contrast to the Olympic lifts, where all three lifts have become "quick lifts" involving a high degree of flexibility, coordination, and practice. Many men are physically and psychologically well-suited for Olympic lifting, but not for Power Lifting. The reverse is also often the case, and the recent surge of interest and participation in Power Lifting presents an excellent and deserved chance for those men who are not cut out for the Olympic lifts to enjoy and gain from competition. For the man who enters competition in Power Lifting, as well as for the bodybuilder who feels a need for more strength to break a slump, Rack Work is the answer. It offers that combination which is rare in many areas of life -- maximum results with a minimum of effort. Detailed below is a program used by some of the Power Lifters and bodybuilders in this area. This program has brought excellent strength increase to all who gave it a fair test. Several variations of the method have been tried here at the University of Texas, but this particular routine has proved to be the most result-producing. Listed below are the exercises, the method or performance, and the poundages used by the author (Terry Todd). Monday: 1) Low Bench Press - begin with the bar just touching the chest. Raise the bar off the chest and hold for 12 seconds. Add weight when the bar can be held off the supports for 12 seconds. 570 lbs. 2) Top Squat - Begin with the bar at about 6 to 8 inches from the completed position. Perform 2 repetitions and pause just above the support pins on the way down from the second rep. Hold this position for 12 seconds; raise the weight again to straight legs; and finally lower the bar to the supports. Add weight when 12 seconds can be done. 1,300 lbs. (Limit of the bar). 3) Top Dead Lift - Begin with the bar at about 6 inches from the completed position. Raise the bar to the completed position being careful not to rest the bar on the thighs, lower to the starting position just above the supports and hold for 12 seconds. Add weight when 12 seconds can be done. 1,070 lbs. (With straps). 4) Frog Kicks - Hang from a chinning bar and pull the knees as close to the chest as possible. Perform one set of 25 repetitions. Tuesday: 1) Middle Position Bench Press - Begin with the bar at approximately the sticking point. Perform 3 repetitions from a dead start. Add weight when 3 reps can be done. 450 lbs. x 3 reps. 2) Low Squat - Begin at the bottom position of the squat. Raise the bar from the support pins and hold off for 12 seconds. Add weight when 12 seconds can be accomplished. 625 lbs. 3) Low Dead Lift - Begin with the bar at the height of the start of a regular dead lift. Raise the bar smoothly off the floor and hold for 6 seconds. Do not jerk the bar off the floor and if the back begins to round or hump excessively, return the bar to the floor or supports. 775 lbs. (With straps). 4) Bentover Rowing - Perform these in the regular fashion for 3 sets of 5 reps. Employ a loose or "cheat" style after thoroughly warming up. 465 lbs. x 3 x 5 reps. (With straps). 5) Frog Kicks - same as Monday. Thursday: 1) Bench Press Lockout - Begin with the bar at about 3 inches from the completed position. Press the bar to arms' length and hold it for 12 seconds with arms slightly bent. Add weight when 12 seconds can be completed. 740 lbs. 2) Top Squat - same as Monday. 3) Middle Dead Lift - Begin with the bar just below the knees. Perform 3 dead lifts from this position. Add weight when 3 reps can be done. 765 lbs x 3 reps. 4) Frog Kicks - same. Saturday: 1) Bench Press - work to a limit or near limit for 3 single repetitions. 465 lbs. x 3 singles. 2) Squat - Work to one limit or near limit single. 640 lbs. x 1. 3) Dead Lift - Work up to one limit or near limit single. 715 lbs. correctly, and 735 lbs. with a hitch. 4) Bentover Rowing - Same as Tuesday. 5) Frog Kicks - Same. The inclusion of the standard application of the bentover rowing exercise may seem strange at first glance, but there are five reasons for its appearance in this routine: 1) It enables the man who does some Olympic lifting to continue exercising the pulling muscles of the arm and shoulder girdle group. As an example, after practicing this program exclusively for two months, the author (Terry Todd) made a power clean with no foot movement of 385 lbs., 10 pounds better than his previous best. 2) It enables the bodybuilder to keep these same large muscle areas well exercised and filled out. 3) It exercises muscle areas that would be neglected unless it were included. In this way, this brief routine becomes complete since every major body part is vigorously worked. 4) The exercise does not lend itself well to work on the Power Rack. Because of balance problems and the chances of a back injury, the bentover row is one of the few major exercises not conducive to the heavy partial movement of Rack Work. 5) Last, but most important for the Power Lifter, the exercise bulks and thickens the latissimus and teres area, which is important in giving the original impetus to the barbell in the bench press. It is interesting to note that Pat Casey (photo below), the world's best in the bench press, always performs some type of latissimus-teres exercise, either the bentover row or the wide grip chin. This is basically the program that has been successful for many Power Lifters and bodybuilders in this area. It is no miracle worker, but it is a program based on a combination of the empirical method of trial and error and the observation of body mechanics. Its success depends in large part on the adherence to the general rules of good health and on the development and cultivation of a positive frame of mind toward whatever objectives are desired. If these rules are followed regularly and diligently, Rack Work can be the solution to many discouraging training problems, as well as the best method of adding those elusive pounds to the three Power Lifts.
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