Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'the complete keys to progress'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Iron Talk
    • Announcements - Guests and Members Must Read
    • General Talk
    • Strength Oldschool Home Gym Training
    • Old School Bodybuilding and Strength Training
    • Monster Arms - Grip Training - Arm Wrestling
  • Recommended Websites
    • Ironmaster UK
    • Ironmaster International
    • Rare and Collectible Books

Blogs

There are no results to display.

Categories

There are no results to display.

Product Groups

There are no results to display.


Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


About Me

Found 3 results

  1. This is all the bodybuilding, weightlifting and autobiography books I've collected over the last 20+ years. I also have a billion bodybuilding magazines stored away in one of my rooms. My favourite magazines were the classic mags from the pre-1970s, for example, Reg Park, Casey Viator, Arnold and Sergio Oliva. My top book which I own is "The Complete Keys to Progress" by John McCallum - outstanding book, which I highly recommend and which you can still buy for cheap on Amazon. Which weight training books do you own?
  2. Maurice Jones The Canadian Hercules By Walt Baptiste (1941) Photo above of Maurice Jones. While touring England as a professional wrestler two years back (1939), Maurice Jones was publicly proclaimed by the former Scotch Hercules, William Bankier (1870 - 1949 ), as being physically superior to both the immortal Eugen Sandow and the mighty George Hackenschmidt (1877 - 1968 ). In my opinion there are only three others who have ever ranked in the same class as the Herculean Maurice Jones. These being John Grimek (1910 - 1998 ), a powerful and amazing specimen of physical perfection; Sam Loprinzi (1913 - 1996 ), who is strong and possesses a marvelously developed physique; the third, and only other, to rank in this class of superior supermen is the immortal Eugen Sandow (1867 - 1925 ) who, though having left this world, continues to be the inspiration of millions throughout the world. Any man who is classed as an equal to or better than Sandow is indeed in a class by himself and deserves praise. Thus Maurice Jones deserves the title “The Canadian Hercules” bestowed upon him. For outright Herculean proportions Maurice has no equal. The author has seen Maurice take a 100 pound (45 kg) solid iron dumbbell with his left hand and with no apparent side bend, press it ten times to arms’ length. He did it so easily there is no doubt that he could have done ten more. Maurice Jones (pictured below) has never included weightlifting proper in his program but used barbells only as a means of body building and strength building as he firmly believed, as do all bodybuilding authorities, that weightlifting motions tend to take all beauty out of a physique. There has never been anyone who ever developed an outstanding powerful body without doing plenty of squats and doing them heavy! In every case heavy squats are one of the main reasons for their super-physiques. Maurice Jones has done plenty of heavy squats. His brother Ken Jones, who has a terrific build himself, notified me that Maurice uses 415 pounds (188 kg) in his routine, doing it 15 times. He does two or three of these sets in each workout. One day after a heavy three-hour workout he took 450 lbs (204 kg) and did it 10 times. This, after he had already performed three sets of 15 reps with 415 pounds (188 kg)! Just to show you how really terrific the Canadian Hercules is let me give you an idea of some of the weights he uses in his exercises. A stiff-legged dead lift standing on a bench using 425 pounds (193 kg), 15 reps. A two arm press using 215 pounds (98 kg), 12 reps. A regular curl, 135 pounds (61 kg), 12 reps. Reverse curl, 120 pounds (55 kg), 12 reps. These are just a few but you can get an idea of his power from the exercises mentioned. Some of his records are as follows. Military Press: 260 pounds (118 kg). Regular Curl: 175 pounds (80 kg). Reverse Curl: 145 pounds (66 kg). Without any scientific ability or training he clean & jerked 325 lbs (148 kg). In all feats of strength he is incomparable. Maurice ranks with the world’s best for abdominal strength and does an abdominal rise with 125 pounds (57 kg) behind his head. He includes apparatus work and hand-balancing in his bodybuilding routines, and for a man of his proportions he handles his body with grace and ease. Maurice can vary his weight almost at will between 195 to 237 pounds. At his most shapely and best condition weighing 210 pounds (95.5 kg) his measurements are: Neck – 18. Chest – 49 ½. Waist – 32. Hips – 39 ½. Thigh – 26 ½. Calf – 17 ½. Bicep – 17 ¾. Forearm – 14 ½. Wrist – 7 ½. Ankle – 9 ½. His largest and most spectacular measurements are at a bodyweight of 237 lbs (108 kg) and are as follows: Height – 5’ 8 ½”. Neck – 18. Normal Chest – 52. Waist – 34 ½. Thigh – 28. Calf – 18. Bicep – 18 ½. Forearm – 14 ½. Wrist – 7 ¾. Ankle – 9 ½. On one occasion Maurice trained down to 195 and his upper arm, beautifully shaped, measured cold on a proven tape, slightly over 18 inches. Imagine. An arm this size on a man weighing under 200 pounds with a wrist of only 7½”. Maurice Jones has certainly disproven the theory of wrist size controlling the upper arm measurement. After his return from England he laid off training for one year. He resumed bodybuilding after this lay off period, and although his strength had ebbed somewhat his physical power recuperated with rapid acceleration. In less than six weeks he performed 3 reps with 245 lbs (111 kg) in the military press, and his biceps once more stretched the tape to 18 inches. Thus proving that great strength and a shapely body once acquired the bar bell way will remain with you through the many years of a lifetime. * Let's now go from 1941 and jump to 1997 when Maurice Jones was 85 years old discussing his life & training - click here. * Maurice Jones is mentioned throughout the classic book "The Complete Keys To Progress". This book contains original articles on weight training written by John McCallum, which first appeared in "Strength & Health" magazine, which ran from June 1965 through to November 1972. An absolute brilliant read and highly recommended.
  3. 1997 Interview with Maurice Jones From Keys To Progress By Randall Strossen (Editor of "The Complete Keys To Progress" book and owner of Milo Magazine) * If you haven't already read an article from 1941 about Maurice Jones, click here. This book contains John McCallum's (photo of John McCallum pictured above) original articles which first appeared in "Strength & Health" magazine, which ran from June 1965 through to November 1972. Some of these articles referred to the mysterious muscle character, Maurice Jones. From the book... Chapter: The Time Factor Page: 2 Quote from book: From the book... Chapter: Power Training Page: 30 Quote from book: First of...Who was John McCallum (1912 - 1993)? John lived in New Westminster, B.C. and worked for the Fire Department. * The following article is from 1997 when Maurice Jones was 85 years old * Any self-respecting student of John McCallum emerged with a number of basic principles, which ranged from squatting until your eyes bulged to achieving an overall balance in your life. The true ‘McCallumite’ knew that he certainly better not be a mirror athlete, nor should he limit himself to just being strong, flexible and having loads of endurance coupled with brimming good health. No, he should recognize that he had a brain, and he should put it to use, cultivating additional interest and activities. So the great paradox was that the McCallumite was out to chase and capture pounds and inches with unparalleled zeal and success, but this was only the beginning – he would also end up becoming a well-rounded person in more than the literal sense. Maurice Jones (pictured below - 1945) was one of the principal characters in McCallum’s articles, and it’s no accident that he stands as a model of this whole-man concept. Since Maurice Jones never sought the spotlight, articles on him were few, and largely confined to rare issues of older muscle magazines. In fact, were it not for John McCallum’s writing the larger world might never have had a chance to benefit from Maurice Jones’s example. Being a rabid McCallum fan back in the 1960's, and never reluctant to seek out someone of interest, I managed to reach Maurice Jones on the telephone, and he patiently answered all the questions a teenaged lifting nut could think to present. I’d also had the advantage then of buying a handful of photos of Maurice Jones from the venerable collector Angelo Luspa. Recently, nearly 30 years later, I had the great fortune and privilege to once again talk at length with Maurice Jones. Maurice Jones started lifting weights when he was about 17 years old. “As a kid I was sickly. I can remember the awful colds I used to have. I wasn’t that healthy, so that’s what made me embark on some kind of training regimen, and one thing led to another.” What it led to was the emergence of a true Hercules – a massively muscled man who was unquestionably among the strongest in the world, and whose muscular and cardio-vascular endurance could sustain labors of heroic proportions. If we turn back the clock to the 1930's, we see a 5’9” 150-pound Maurice Jones beginning to lift weights. Although his eventual success might not have been predicted by any, his tenacity should have signaled that good things, amazing things, were to follow: If you want to understand what it means to train consistently, just remember that in his first 5 ½ years of training, Maurice Jones never missed a single workout. In the intervening decades, this dedication has never wavered. “I wasn’t away from them (the weights) for very lengthy periods. I valued it greatly. I always felt so much better when I would have a good workout. I stayed with it,” explains Jones. “I held a certain amount of self-pride, I was going to stick with it till the end. You know, that attitude, and I’m still doing that. I do lots of situps and press-ups between two chairs at times when weights aren’t available.” As we go to press (1997), Maurice is about to turn 85, and he reports, “I’m training. I’m very active physically.” And while he laughs at the weights he uses, consider this: He still does presses and curls with 50-lb. dumbells! “That’s nothing compared to what I once handled,” he says apologetically, but if those weights don’t speak to his fortitude, consider that Maurice Jones also continues with his “outdoor activities – cycling and trail hiking.” Mountains have long been his passion so it shouldn’t be surprising to hear that there have been some accidents along the way, which have led to a string of surgeries on his back, neck, and both knees. “I’m an avid alpinist, and that’s when most of the injuries occurred,” explains Jones. “I can’t blame it on the weights,” he says with a laugh. Currently weighing “a stable 185,” Jones says the most he ever weighed was 225, although he generally weighed 200. “I didn’t stay up at that heavy weight for a great length of time. I was quite comfortable at 200 pounds.” Once when I was talking to Doug Hepburn, I told him that when people asked me about Maurice Jones, I’d say, “Well, picture a cross between Doug Hepburn and John Grimek.” Doug thought about that for a minute and then said, “That’s not a bad description.” Considering that he emerged as such a formidable physical specimen, Maurice Jones’ training program should be of great interest. “I’d work out for sometimes two hours – that was when I was younger, up until probably 40 or 45 or something. That would be three times [per week], two hours,” said Jones, and when asked for an authentic workout, here’s what Jones said: “I’d do a bit of a warmup at the beginning, before I’d start: calisthenics, bending, arm waving, that sort of thing. I’d always start with situps on the steep board. Then I’d do my presses: Press, curl, press, curl. Rest a minute and then do another press and another curl. Three sets altogether. That was the military press. I didn’t do those leaning back presses. They called them military presses at that time. Then I’d do three sets of rowing motions; I’d do my bench presses in between (row, bench press, row, bench press, row, bench press). Three sets of bench presses." “Now the squat. One set of heavy squats up around 400 pounds – about a dozen repetitions. At that time I was still doing hiking on weekends so I got plenty of legwork there, and I’d have 30 or 40 pounds on my back in my rucksack. 400 pounds sometimes and if I’d drop the weight, I’d increase the reps." “In between sets, I’d rest a minute – I wouldn’t sit down. I know some fellows who used to train a gym I worked at a couple of times would sit down and read a magazine in between exercises,” Jones said with a smile. A cardinal principle in Maurice Jones training was strict style: “I always tried to adhere to good form. I couldn’t stand these guys that would come in and be curling and it would be a back exercise as well. That didn’t go over well with me at all. I wanted to see a straight body, and the arms working as they should.” Considering his immaculate form, it was remarkable that Maurice Jones used to do presses behind the neck with 200 pounds for 12 reps and dumbell curls 70 lbs. x 12 well before World War II (1939 - 1945) – figure what that’s worth in today’s terms, and your jaw should hit the floor. Asked about his squatting, Maurice Jones said “I got up into the very heavy stuff – it used to frighten me before the act. How it all came about was with Milo Steinborn: I read that he had created a world record in the deep knee bend, which I was bound and determined to break, but nobody knew anything about it. And I did get up there over 500. My memory doesn’t serve me as well as it used to, but it was around 525 pounds.” Not one to brag, Maury doesn’t bother to mention that this lift put him among the foremost squatters of the day. Perhaps even more prodigious were his performances in the stiff legged deadlift, where he did 425 for 15 repetitions in ultra-strict style: standing on a bench, lowering each rep to the tops of his feet. If the 425 x 15 isn’t already impressive enough, consider that Jones allows that “it [the poundage] may have wandered a little higher from time to time.” While running was not as central to his training program as was weight training, it wasn’t uncommon for him to include running a couple of times a week.” Maurice attributes his high level of muscular and cardiovascular endurance to a combination of his weight training, running and his mountain hiking. Asked if the stories of him putting rocks in his rucksack before taking off up a mountain were true, he said they were. “I used to be crazy,” he laughed. “I still do that, as a matter of fact. I put in at least 30 pounds, just to get a little additional benefit.” It’s tempting to think that this dedication to training means that somehow training hard came easy to Maurice Jones, but that’s not the case. “I’ve put up with a lot of pain over the years, years I suffered, but I never avoided my training. You can’t do it for the best part of your life and just forget it. The way I’m built, I have to continue, obviously not as strenuously as before, but I never forget it. I guess there are a lot of weight trainers and people who have done over a period of years and are still doing it.” Asked about his diet, Maurice said it “was just very plain. I’m afraid that I just qualify as a meat and potatoes man.” It has been reported that Maury disliked Olympic-style weightlifting, but he said that isn’t true. “I never went in for weightlifting myself because I didn’t have the time, mainly.” Nonetheless, the first time he tried a clean and jerk it was with 300 pounds on an exercise bar, and Jones says, “It was easy for me. I couldn’t believe it, you know, once I got those legs in action. That was when they did a split, not a squat. One chap came up from California, and that was the first time I saw a squat clean, and the snatch the same way. I couldn’t figure out why he didn’t fall over when he did a snatch!” Although Maurice worked as a graphic artist and retired as a director of the YMCA, earlier in his life he wrestled professionally in England and on the Continent. Even though this was quite a while ago, some things never change because when asked about it, Jones said, with distaste, it was “as phony as anything could be.” Pro-wrestling seems out of character for Jones, but he explained, “It was a means to an end for me. I wanted to continue with my schooling, and my father was very ill at the time. I had to keep the household going.” Asked what he’d say if a young kid came up to him and said, “Mr. Jones, do you think I should take drugs to get bigger muscles or to get stronger?”: “I would say, don’t become a fanatic, although I must have appeared that way to a lot of people. If you get fanatical about something, it spoils it. You have to recognize the line – that’s the trouble.” To read more stories about Maurice Jones, Reg Park, Basic Training, etc get the book "The Complete Keys To progress" by John McCallum.
×
×
  • Create New...